Nothin' On But The Radio
Nothin' On But The Radio
Nothin’ On But The Radio takes a great mold, breaks it, and builds a better one! Produced by Dave Bartholomew (who also produced 2003's “Stayin' After Class”) the band members focused on making a record that felt like a band, not your typical paint by numbers type of record you hear everyday. An honest record, with no tricks. Real Guitars. Real Amplifiers. Real Drums.

Raleigh's Bleeding Hearts may have been “Stayin' After Class” on their debut CD, but their newest release finds them graduated and all grown up to a more mature, but still rockin', sound. That's not to say they've abandoned their angst-ridden, 70's style riff rock, with hooks so big you want to hold up your Pabst Blue Ribbon and scream “Hell Yeah!” from the very first note.

Musically Nothin’ On But The Radio, would fit right into any music collection where Cheap Trick’s “Live at Budokan”, KISS “Alive” AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell” are favored discs. Listen carefully and you'll hear a little .38 Special sneak into guitarist Joe Yerry's riffage. And you'll definitely hear plenty of musical references to North Carolina's own semi-forgotten '70s pop-rock geniuses Nantucket.

But while the debut spent a lot of lyrical time dwelling on the good times and excitement of youth, the latest CD explores what happens the morning after, when the party's over, you're all alone and the good time girl who broke your heart is headed off to rehab.

On ‘In A Bad Place’, singer-guitarist Sam Madison sings about wanting so badly to work it out but his lover can't because she's ‘in a bad place right now’. When he gets the ultimate ‘I love you like a brother’ rejection on ‘It Hurts’, all he can do is scream the title over and over again until his voice is raw, like a kid who just can't believe he's not going to get what he wants.

Maybe The Bleeding Hearts' Young, Loud and Snotty attitude hasn't grown up that much after all!
$ 7.97
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Stayin' After Class
Stayin' After Class
Born from the seeds of discontent - either in their previous bands or in the current state of the NC music scene, The Bleeding Hearts set out with one goal - to have fun playing music. And that is exactly what they have done. “It has been a blast from day one”, says Sam Madison (lead singer and guitarist), “there were no expectations, no rock star attitudes or delusions of grandeur, we just wanted to play in a kick ass rock and roll band”. Though they have received a barrage of press and hype since their first show in April of ’03, The Bleeding Hearts are no “flash in the pan”. “The audience really seems to like our songs. It’s the joy of performing that comes across. That’s what people remember.”

The line-up includes Joe Yerry (guitar, vocals), Jim Britt (bass, vocals), Scott Taylor (drums, vocals) and Sam Madison (vocals, guitar). Jim, Joe and Scott are all transplants from NY, but have lived in Raleigh for nearly ten years. They have been in several bands separately but had not played live in a few years. Sam is a veteran of the North Carolina music scene dating back to the early ‘80s. Some of his projects include Bloodmobile, Pit Boss, Big Dixie and Man Will Destroy Himself.

The Bleeding Hearts sound is difficult to describe. More than any one style of music, they are an era of music, the late 70’s. They try to incorporate the guitar-pop of Cheap Trick, The Knack and The Cars; the hard rock of KISS, AC/DC and Ted Nugent; the punk sounds of The Ramones and Johnny Thunders with the sleaze and soul of mid-period Rolling Stones. The songs are upbeat and guitar oriented, often with sarcastic lyrics. Live, they are raw, aggressive and power-packed, with the flash and swagger of 70’s arena rock delivered with a punk rock edge.
- Abray Records
$ 7.97
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